Dental Anxiety: 3 Ways to Stop Fearing the Dentist | American Dental Association

If you ever get nervous just thinking about going to the dentist, you’re not alone. Perhaps you’re scared the visit might hurt or you haven’t been in a while and not sure what the dentist will find.

Whatever your reason, the right dental team will make sure your dental and your emotional health are taken care of. The more you delay – or just don’t go – to the dentist, the higher your risk of developing dental problems that will make gearing up for future dental visits more difficult.

Follow the link below to see ways to stop fearing the dentist…

— Ersland Family Dentistry

 

Source: Dental Anxiety: 3 Ways to Stop Fearing the Dentist | American Dental Association

Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 | Mouth Healthy

Break these bad brushing habits in 2019 for a healthier mouth and smile!

 

Keeping Your Toothbrush for Too Long

The ADA recommends changing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, so make a resolution to change your toothbrush with every season this year. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your teeth clean—these are signs it’s time to let go.

 

Not Brushing Long Enough

Speed demons, listen up! Your teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. Most of us fall short —the average time most people spend brushing is 45 seconds. If you’re racing through cleaning, try setting a timer.

 

Brushing Too Hard

Be gentle with your teeth. You may think brushing harder will remove more leftover food and the bacteria that loves to eat it, but a gentle brushing is all that’s needed. Too much pressure may damage your gums.

 

Brushing Right After Eating

If you feel the need to clean your teeth after eating or drinking, wait at least 60 minutes before brushing—especially if you have had something acidic like lemons, grapefruit or soda. Drink water or chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance to help clean your mouth while you are waiting to brush.

 

Storing Your Brush Improperly

When you’re done brushing, keep your toothbrush upright and let it air dry in the open. Avoid keeping your toothbrush in a closed container, where germs have more opportunity to grow.

 

Using a Brush with Hard Bristles

Soft bristles are a safe bet. And be mindful to be gentle, especially where your gums and teeth meet, as you brush. Talk to your dentist about what kind of toothbrush is best for you.

 

Improper Brushing Technique

Here’s one technique to try for a thorough brush: First, place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. Then, gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. Next, brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finally, To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

 

Using a Brush That’s Not the Best Fit for You

There are many toothbrushes that can leave your teeth fresh and clean, including manual and power brushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Both get the job done. Try different types until you find one you’re comfortable with. For example, a power brush can be easier to hold and does some of the work for you if you have trouble brushing.

 

 

— Ersland Family Dentistry

 

Source: 8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019

 

Sedation Dentistry: To Sleep or Not to Sleep: That is the Question | Patient Connect 365

 

As dental procedures have become less invasive over the past few decades, it’s no longer necessary to be put to “sleep” for a procedure that might have meant a noon-day nap not so long ago. What should you know about sedation dentistry? What are the benefits, and why is it used?

 

So if the dentist gives you the chills, be sure to ask them about oral sedation during your next appointment.

 

— Ersland Family Dentistry

 

Source: Sedation Dentistry: To Sleep or Not to Sleep: That is the Question | Patient Connect 365

The Perfect Road Map To Oral Health | Patient Connect 365

 

Wouldn’t it be nice to have a handy map you could use to chart your own dental health? With that in mind, here are a few mile markers you can use to stay on top of your health today, next year, and for years to come!

Staying on top of your oral health isn’t as hard as you think, and if you keep this schedule of events to watch out for handy, you’ll be ahead of most of your neighbors when it comes to a healthy mouth and body. Come to think of it … why not share it with them as well? They’ll thank you for the help!

— Ersland Family Dentistry

 

Source: The Perfect Road Map To Oral Health | Patient Connect 365

Why Your Snoring Isn’t as Innocent as You Believe | Patient Connect 365

If the sonorous chorus of a loved one’s snoring has you at your wit’s end, rather than burying your face in your pillow and lambasting them in the morning for their motorcycle muffler cacophony, you may wish to suggest they see the doctor instead…

Is it Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is serious business, and shouldn’t be ignored. If you or anyone in your family is experiencing these symptoms, please come in for a consultation.

— Ersland Family Dentistry

Source: Why Your Snoring Isn’t as Innocent as You Believe | Patient Connect 365 

Cold and Flu Season: 5 Ways to Care for Your Mouth When You’re Sick | American Dental Association

When he’s feeling under the weather, ADA dentist Dr. Gene Romo says one thing always helps him feel a little more like himself. “Brushing my teeth when I’m sick actually makes me feel better,” he says. “My mouth feels clean, and in a way, I feel like my health is starting to improve.”

When you have a cold or the flu, taking care of your body is your top priority—and that includes your mouth. “It’s important to take care of your dental health all year round, but especially when you’re sick,” Dr. Romo says.

— Ersland Family Dentistry

Source: Cold and Flu Season: 5 Ways to Care for Your Mouth When You’re Sick | American Dental Association

Bad Breath: 6 Causes (and 7 Solutions) | American Dental Association

Bad breath happens. If you’ve ever gotten that not-so-fresh feeling on a date, at a job interview or just talking with friends, you’re not alone. Studies show that 50 percent of adults have had bad breath, or halitosis, at some point in their lives.

There are a number of reasons you might have dragon breath. While many causes are harmless, bad breath can sometimes be a sign of something more serious.

— Ersland Family Dentistry

Source: Bad Breath: 6 Causes (and 7 Solutions) | American Dental Association

Thanksgiving Snacks Kids Will Crave Their Whole Lives | Patient Connect 365

In the United States, November is a month of celebration and change. Sundays are filled with football; plans for Thanksgiving preoccupy our minds; and for most of us, temperatures edge closer to freezing.

In the spirit of these two themes (celebration and change), we’re offering a few dead-simple, good-for-you food switcheroos to help you celebrate!

— Ersland Family Dentistry

Source: Thanksgiving Snacks Kids Will Crave Their Whole Lives | Patient Connect 365

5 Steps to a Flawless Floss | American Dental Association

Turkey caught in your teeth? Good thing the Friday after Thanksgiving is National Floss Day! Perfect your technique with this step-by-step guide.

We know we should floss at least once a day, but not everyone knows the right way to do it. Use this step-by-step guide to find out how to properly floss your teeth:

— Ersland Family Dentistry

Source: 5 Steps to a Flawless Floss | American Dental Association

What Causes Sensitive Teeth? | American Dental Association

“Proper oral hygiene is the key to preventing sensitive-tooth pain.”

Do you feel a twinge of pain when drinking coffee or breathing in cold air? If you answered “yes,” you may be dealing with sensitive teeth. Click on the link below for a great resource on what causes sensitive teeth and possible treatment options.

— Ersland Family

Source: What Causes Sensitive Teeth? | American Dental Association