What’s the Difference Between a Crown and Filling?

Are you curious about the difference between a crown and filling? It’s normal to be confused about dental terminology. Unless you’re in the profession yourself, it can be easier to smile and nod while in the chair than ask about all the ins and outs of any procedure recommended to you.

First, let’s give you a brief reason why you would need a crown or a filling: tooth decay. . Acid from food or from bacteria wears away at your tooth enamel and creates a hole where bacteria can enter and make their home. Left alone, tooth decay will only get worse, be extremely painful, and be expensive to treat.

Fillings and crowns are your dentist’s first lines of defense to prevent further tooth decay.

If you want to know more about crowns and fillings in Anchorage, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us at Ersland Family Dental. You can contact us through our website or visit us today!

— Ersland Family Dentistry

Source: What’s the Difference Between a Crown and Filling? | Patient Connect 365

Dental Veneers Help to Perfect Smiles | Patient Connect 365

 

Everyone wants that Hollywood smile, but not everyone is lucky enough to be born with perfect teeth. Chips, irregular shapes, and discoloration of teeth are not uncommon and can make people hide their smiles or feel uncomfortable.

If your teeth make you self-conscious for any reason, dental veneers may be a solution to consider.

Your dentist may recommend veneers for one or several of your teeth to correct: worn down teeth, fractured teeth, discolored teeth, chipped or broken teeth, misaligned teeth or gaps between your teeth.

If you would like to learn more about veneers, talk to your dentist at your next scheduled appointment.

 

— Ersland Family Dentistry

 

Source: Dental Veneers Help to Perfect Smiles | Patient Connect 365

Dental Anxiety: 3 Ways to Stop Fearing the Dentist | American Dental Association

If you ever get nervous just thinking about going to the dentist, you’re not alone. Perhaps you’re scared the visit might hurt or you haven’t been in a while and not sure what the dentist will find.

Whatever your reason, the right dental team will make sure your dental and your emotional health are taken care of. The more you delay – or just don’t go – to the dentist, the higher your risk of developing dental problems that will make gearing up for future dental visits more difficult.

Follow the link below to see ways to stop fearing the dentist…

— Ersland Family Dentistry

 

Source: Dental Anxiety: 3 Ways to Stop Fearing the Dentist | American Dental Association

Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 | Mouth Healthy

Break these bad brushing habits in 2019 for a healthier mouth and smile!

 

Keeping Your Toothbrush for Too Long

The ADA recommends changing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, so make a resolution to change your toothbrush with every season this year. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your teeth clean—these are signs it’s time to let go.

 

Not Brushing Long Enough

Speed demons, listen up! Your teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. Most of us fall short —the average time most people spend brushing is 45 seconds. If you’re racing through cleaning, try setting a timer.

 

Brushing Too Hard

Be gentle with your teeth. You may think brushing harder will remove more leftover food and the bacteria that loves to eat it, but a gentle brushing is all that’s needed. Too much pressure may damage your gums.

 

Brushing Right After Eating

If you feel the need to clean your teeth after eating or drinking, wait at least 60 minutes before brushing—especially if you have had something acidic like lemons, grapefruit or soda. Drink water or chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance to help clean your mouth while you are waiting to brush.

 

Storing Your Brush Improperly

When you’re done brushing, keep your toothbrush upright and let it air dry in the open. Avoid keeping your toothbrush in a closed container, where germs have more opportunity to grow.

 

Using a Brush with Hard Bristles

Soft bristles are a safe bet. And be mindful to be gentle, especially where your gums and teeth meet, as you brush. Talk to your dentist about what kind of toothbrush is best for you.

 

Improper Brushing Technique

Here’s one technique to try for a thorough brush: First, place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. Then, gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. Next, brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finally, To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

 

Using a Brush That’s Not the Best Fit for You

There are many toothbrushes that can leave your teeth fresh and clean, including manual and power brushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Both get the job done. Try different types until you find one you’re comfortable with. For example, a power brush can be easier to hold and does some of the work for you if you have trouble brushing.

 

 

— Ersland Family Dentistry

 

Source: 8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019